.

.Nabii   نَبِيّ  Prophet Allahs   Pl. Ambiaa'  (Friede und Segen Allahs auf ihnen allen). Manche der Ambiaa' sind im Rang eines Rasuul (Gesandter Allahs).   


 

 

Propheten sind nicht durch eigne Anstrengungen zu Propheten geworden sondern wurden von Allah, ihrem Schöpfer, dazu vorbestimmt (Qadtaa).

Adam, Ibrahim, Musa, 'Isa (Jesus), und alle anderen Gesandte Allahs (der Friede und Segen Allahs sei auf ihnen allen) verkündeten den die Ergebenheit in den Willen ihres Schöpfers (der Einzige Gott) im Kontext unterschiedlicher Gebiete, Zeiten und Kulturen (Interfaces). Adam (Friede mit ihm) war der erste und Muhhammad (der Friede und Segen Allahs sei auf ihm) war der letzte Gesandte in einer langen Reihe und er verkündete die Offenbarung, welche heute als Qur'aan erhalten ist und erklärte auch, wie der Qur'aan zu verstehen bzw. zu leben ist (Sunnah).

Diejenigen unter den Ambiaa' (Propheten), welche neu Offenbarungen erhalten hatten, die werden Rasuul (Großgesandte) genannt. Abgesehen von en im Qur'aan erwähnten Propheten, gibt es insgesamt 120.000, doch sind deren Namen nicht bekannt.

 

 

 

 

Propheten and Gesandte, die im Qur'aaan genannt sind.

Alle Gesandten, die im Qur'aan genannt sind, sind auch Propheten, aber nicht alle Propheten sind Gesandte.

 

Wikipedia:

 

No.

Name

Akadem.

Transkription

Equiv.

Prophet
(Nabii)

Gesandter
(Rasuul)

Erzprophet
ʾUlu-l-ʿAzm

Gesetz
Schar'iah

Buch

Offenbarung

gelebt / Zeit

gesandt zu

Bemerkungen

1

Adam

آدَم
(ʾĀdam)

Adam

✓ [67]

✓ [67]

Birth of humanity

Earth[68]

First Prophet and father of all the human beings

2

Idriis

إِدْرِيس
(ʾIdrīs)

Enoch?

✓ [69]

?

Never stated, later traditions claim Babylon

"Raised... to an exalted place".

3

Nuhh

نُوح
(Nūḥ)

Noah

✓ [73]

✓ [74]

✓ [75]

✓ [76]

Great Flood

People of Noah[77]

Survivor of the Great Flood

4

Huud

هُود
(Hūd)

 

✓ [78]

✓ [78]

c. 2400 BC[79]

ʿĀd tribe[80]

Merchant

5

Salihh

صَالِح
(Ṣāliḥ)

 

✓ [81]

✓ [81]

?

Thamud tribe[82]

Camel breeder

6

Ibrahiim

إِبْرَاهِيم
(ʾIbrāhīm)

Abraham

✓ [83]

✓ [84]

✓ [85]

✓ [76]

Scrolls of Abraham[53]

Migration of the
Jews to Iraq[citation needed]

People of
Iraq and Syria[86]

Builder of the Kaaba

7

Lutd

لُوط
(Lūṭ)

Lot

✓ [87]

✓ [88]

?

"People of
Lot"[89]
(Sodom and Gomorrah)

Did not live in Palestine, but was considered "brethren" by its inhabitants.

8

Isma'iil

إِسْمَاعِيل
(ʾIsmāʿīl)

Ishmael

✓ [90]

✓ [90]

?

Pre-Islamic Arabia
(Mecca)

Founder of the Arabian people

9

Ischaaq

إِسْحَاق
(ʾIsḥāq)

Isaac

✓ [91]

?

Canaan

Founders of the Israelite people

10

Y'aquub

يَعْقُوب
(Yaʿqūb)

Jacob

✓ [91]

?

Twelve Tribes
of Israel

11

Yuusuf

يُوسُف
(Yūsuf)

Joseph

✓ [92]

✓ [93]

?

Egypt

Possessed a gift for prophecy.

12

Ayyuub

أَيُّوب
(ʾAyyūb)

Job

✓ [92]

?

Edom

Known for his patience.[94]

13

Schuʿayb

شُعَيْب
(Shuʿayb)

 

✓ [95]

✓ [95]

?

Midian[96]

Shepherd

14

Muusaa

مُوسَىٰ
(Mūsā)

Moses

✓ [97]

✓ [97]

✓ [75]

✓ [76]

Tawrah (Torah); Scrolls of Moses[45]

c. 1400s BCE – c. 1300s BCE, or c. 1300s BCE – c. 1200s BCE

Pharaoh and his establishment[98]

Challenged the Pharaoh; lead the migration back to Israel

15

Haaruun

هَارُون
(Hārūn)

Aaron

✓ [99]

✓ [97]

?

Pharaoh and his establishment

Vizier, brother of Moses

16

Dauud

دَاوُۥد \ دَاوُود
(Dāūd)

David

✓ [73]

[73]

Zabur[100]
(Psalms)

c. 1000s BCE – c. 971 BCE

Jerusalem

Military commander, 2nd king of Israel

17

Sulaymaan

سُلَيْمَان
(Sulaymān)

Solomon

✓ [73]

c. 971 BCE – c. 931 BCE

Jerusalem

Copperworker, 3rd and last king of the United Monarchy; built the First Temple; Son of Dawud

18

Ilyaas

إِلْيَاس
(ʾIlyās)

Elijah

✓ [73]

✓ [101]

?

"People of
Ilyas"[102]
(Children of Israel)

Silk weaver

19

Alyas'a

ٱلْيَسَع
(Alyasaʿ)

Elisha

✓ [73]

?

Children
of Israel

20

Yuunus

يُونُس
(Yūnus)

Jonah

✓ [73]

✓ [103]

?

"People of
Yunus"[104]
(Nineveh)

Swallowed by
giant fish

21

Dhuu-l-Kifl

ذُو ٱلْكِفْل
(Ḏū l-Kifli)

Disputed

✓ [110]

?

Unknown, due in part to uncertain identity

Identity still unknown.

22

Zakariiya

زَكَرِيَّا
(Zakariyyā)

Zechariah

✓ [73]

?

Jerusalem

Father of Yahya; was assassinated

23

Yahya

يَحْيَىٰ
(Yaḥyā)

John the Baptist

✓ [111]

?

Jerusalem

Was assassinated

24

'Isaa

عِيسَىٰ
(ʿĪsā)

Jesus

✓ [112]

✓ [113]

✓ [76]

✓ [75]

Injil[114]
(Gospel)

c. 4 BCE – c. 30 CE

Children of
Israel[115]

The Messiah

25

Muhhammad

مُحَمَّد
(Muḥammad)

 

✓ [116][117]

✓ [118]

✓ [85]

✓ [76]

Quran[119]

571 – 632

All humanity
and jinn[120]

Shepherd, merchant, founder of IslamSeal of the Prophets

Figures whose prophethood is debated [edit]

Figures whose prophethood is debated

Name

Arabic

(transliteration)

Equivalent

Sent to

Note

Shayth[121]

شَيْث

(Šayṯ)

Seth

Mankind[122]

He is not mentioned in the Quran, but he is mentioned in Hadith, and is revered within Islamic tradition.

Kaleb

كالب

(Kaleb)

Caleb

Israel

In the Quran, Caleb is mentioned in the 5th surah of the Quran (Q5:20-26).

Yusha bin Nun

يُوشَع

(Yūšaʿ')

Joshua

Israel[123][124]

Yusha (Joshua) is not mentioned by name in the Quran, but his name appears in other Islamic literature and in multiple Hadith. In the Quranic account of the conquest of Canaan, Joshua and Caleb are referenced, but not named, as two men, on whom God "had bestowed His grace". Yusha is regarded by most scholars as to the prophetic successor to Musa (Moses). Joshua is the assistant of Moses when he visits al Khidr, and according to the Torah and the Bible, he was one of the two tribe messengers, along with Caleb that brought news that Jerusalem was habitable for the Jews. Joshua is also Moses' successor as the leader of the Jews, who led them to settle in Israel after Moses' death. Joshua (Yusha) entering into Jerusalem is also mentioned in the Hadith.

Khidr

ٱلْخَضِر

(al-Khaḍir)

Unknown

The seas,[126] the oppressed peoples,[126] Israel, [Quran 18:65-82] Mecca,[127] and all lands where a prophet exists[128]

The Quran also mentions the mysterious Khidr (but does not name him), identified at times with Melchizedek, who is the figure that Moses accompanies on one journey. Although most Muslims regard him as an angel or enigmatic saint,[129] some see him as a prophet as well.[130]

Luqman

لُقْمَان

(Luqmān)

-

 

The Quran mentions the sage Luqman in the chapter named after him, but does not clearly identify him as a prophet. The most widespread Islamic belief[133] views Luqman as a saint, but not as a messenger, however, other Muslims regard Luqman as a messenger as well.[134] The Arabic term wali is commonly translated into English as "Saint". This should not be confused with the Christian tradition of sainthood.

Samuil

صَمُوئِيل

(Ṣamūʾīl)

Samuel

 

Not mentioned by name, only referred to as a messenger/prophet sent to the Israelites and who anoints Saul as a king.[123][124]

Talut

طَالُوت

(Ṭālūt)

Saul[135] or Gideon

 

Some Muslims refer to Saul as Talut, and believe that he was the commander of Israel. Other scholars, however, have identified Talut as Gideon. According to the Qur'an, Talut was chosen by Samuel to lead them into war. Talut led the Israelites to victory over the army of Goliath, who was killed by Dawud (David). According some, Saul is not considered a prophet, but a divinely appointed king.[137]

Irmīyyah[138]

إِرْمِيَا

(ʾ'Irmiyā)

Jeremiah

Israel[139]

He does not appear in the Quran or any canonical hadith, but his narrative is fleshed out in Muslim literature and exegesis, moreover some non-canonical hadith and tafsirs narrate that the Parable of the Hamlet in Ruins is about Irmiya.[140]

Hizqil

حِزْقِيل

(Ḥizqīl)

Ezekiel

Babylon

He is often identified as being the same figure as Dhul-Kifl,[141] Although not mentioned in the Qur'an by the name, Muslim scholars, both classical[142] and modern[143] have included Ezekiel in lists of the prophets of Islam.

Daniyal[144]

دَانِيَال

(Dāniyāl)

Daniel

Babylon[145]

Usually considered by Muslims to be a prophet, but he is not mentioned in the Qur'an, nor in Sunni Muslim hadith, but he is a prophet according to Shia Muslim hadith.[146][147]

Dhu al-Qarnayn

ذُو ٱلْقَرْنَيْن

(Ḏū l-Qarnayn)

Unknown 

The people he met on his travels[155]

He appears in the Quran 18:83-101 as one who travels to east and west and erects a barrier between mankind and Gog and Magog (called Ya'juj and Ma'juj).[156]

Uzair

عُزَيْر

(ʿUzayr)

Ezra

Israel

He is mentioned in the Quran,[157] but he is not specified to have been a prophet, although many Islamic scholars hold Uzair to be one of the prophets.[158][159]

Imran

عِمْرَان

(ʿImrān)

Joachim

Israel

The Family of Imran (Arabicآل عمران) is the 3rd chapter of the Quran. Imran, not to be confused with Amram,[160] is Arabic for the biblical figure Joachim, the father of Mary and maternal grandfather of Jesus.

Maryam

مَرْيَم

(Maryam)

Mary

Israel

Some scholars[161][162] regard Maryam (Mary) as a messenger and a prophetess, since God sent her a message through an angel and because she was a vessel for divine miracles. Islamic belief regards her as one of the holiest of women, but the matter of her prophethood continues to be debated.[163]

To believe in God's messengers (Rusul) means to be convinced that God sent men as guides to fellow human beings and jinn (khalq) to guide them to the truth.

.